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  • Nikki Robinson 10:18 am on May 14, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 10k, achilles tendonitis, back, hatfield broad oak, , itb, , , , , plantarfasciitis, road race, running, shin splints, training   

    Keep on Running 

    Hatfield Broad Oak’s annual 10k Road Race and 1 Mile Fun Run are on Bank Holiday Monday on 29th May. This is the 32nd year that the race has been held and it’s one of the most popular 10k races for serious and casual runners alike. It’s open to runners aged 15 and over and approximately 1500 runners take part every year. The 1 Mile Fun Run is for younger runners and their friends and family.

    It is a great event and the participants are in their final weeks of preparation. Preparation is extremely important because it’s estimated that almost 80% of runners worldwide are injured every year. At Holisticare we can help you to be ready for the run (though we won’t be running alongside you in your training runs!) and we can also help your body recover afterwards.

    Runner’s World magazine says that 10k is the UK’s most popular race distance. 10k is about 6.2 miles so it’s great for those who are building up their strength and endurance towards a half marathon or a full marathon but it’s also great for the more casual runner who possibly has less time to commit to training but still wants a reasonable length run as a challenge.

    They recommend that if you’re a first-time 10k runner you should increase your training distance gradually but about ¼ to ½ a mile at a time and UK runner Jo Pavey says to run at your own pace, take rest days and if you’ve got a niggle delay what you’re doing for a day, don’t just push through it. If you’ve got a target to achieve or beat a specific time then US Olympic runner and 10k record holder, Galen Rupp, advises varying your training practice to include runs at target pace, a little slower and a little faster.

    Female runner knee injury and pain.

    Five of the most common ailments and injuries that runners are prone to are:
    • Runner’s knee (patellofemoral pain syndrome – PFPS) – pain slightly above or below the kneecap
    • Achilles tendonitis – pain and swelling on the back of your heel
    • Plantarfasciitis – pain in the heel or underside of your foot
    • Iliotibial band syndrome – a pain-giving injury to the connective tissues – the iliotibial band which is a thick band that begins at the iliac crest in the pelvis, runs down the outer part of the thigh, and crosses the knee to attach into the top part of the shinbone
    • Shin Splints (medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) – a cumulative stress disorder, with shins that feel hot and pain along the inner edge of the shin bone even while resting.

    Other injuries common to runners are sprains, pulled muscles, blisters and getting a stitch. Most of these are caused by repeated stress on the bones, muscles and joints as you run on the hard surface of a road or track. Holisticare therapists can help reduce your risk of injury in your training and the race and then bring your body back to comfort after the run. We assess your posture and look at any movements that are restricted by pain or stiffness then use the John F. Barnes Myofascial Release technique to realign your body, soothe pain, release restrictions in the fascia and improve your flexibility and range of movement.

    If you, or someone you know, are planning to join the HBO 10k Road Race, make an appointment with us for before and after the race so that you can keep on running!

     
  • Nikki Robinson 1:45 pm on May 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: asthma, , fascia, hatfield broad oak, , , , , research, restrictions, shortness of breath, , wheezing   

    Breathe In 

    breathingWorld Asthma Day is an annual event organised by the Global Initiative for Asthma to improve awareness and care for sufferers. This year it is on Tuesday 2nd May so this week is an ideal opportunity to tell you that Myofascial Release Treatment could be of benefit if you are affected by asthma.

    Fascia is a tissue throughout the body in a three dimensional web from head to toe. It holds your cells in their place, including muscles, bones, nerves, organs and vessels. It guards against overextension and absorbs tensile and compressive forces. If our fascia is restricted these forces cannot be dispersed. Myofascial release aims to relieve soft tissue and fascial restriction to enable patients to achieve a more normal range of movement.

    What has this got to do with asthma?

    In 1999 a post-graduate student at Oklahoma State University carried out a study on “Physical Therapy Intervention in Childhood Asthma: Myofascial Release Techniques and Massage”, using the gentle, non-invasive John Barnes technique that we use at Holisticare, for her Master of Science Degree.

    Data was gathered from parents about the frequency of their children’s asthmatic episodes and their prescribed medication in the 2 years prior to MFR treatment and in the year post-treatment. A control group received ordinary massage. The Myofascial techniques used were temporal, mandibular, maxillary, hyoid, thoracic inlet and respiratory diaphragm releases.

    The control group did show some improvement after treatment but the Myofascial Release group showed marked improvement. In the year post-treatment 75% of the MFR group showed a reduction in asthmatic episodes and the remaining 25% stayed the same, and most subjects reported a reduction in required medication in either frequency of dose or number of different medications. Although it was quite a small study the results are positive.

    It is thought that by releasing the tightened fascial system the pressure on the lungs, autonomic nervous system, or the cranial nerves supplying the pulmonary system is reduced, thereby reducing the symptoms of asthma.

    While Myofascial Release is not a cure for asthma it may help you breathe more easily. Call us for an appointment on 01279 718331.

    Reminders

    Our Helping Hands Competition in aid of St Clare Hospice is up and running and is open to all age groups from pre-school upwards.
    We are now taking booking for teams (of up to 8 people) for our Quiz Night on Friday 30 June and raffle tickets are also now on sale.
    If you would like to enter the competition, book a team, buy raffle tickets or donate a raffle prize please get in touch on 01279 718331 or talk to any of the Holisticare Team who will be happy to help.

     
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